“When it comes to businesses in the community, we are now more active than men.”

“I want to become a teacher.”

“I own three businesses. I am able to send my children to school.”
“Nobody should underestimate the strength of these women.”
“When it comes to businesses in the community, we are now more active than men.”
“I want to become a teacher.”
“I  own three businesses. I am able to send my children to school.”

EMPOWERING WOMEN  ENTREPRENEURS
IMPACTED BY CLIMATE CHANGE

THE BOMA PROJECT is helping women entrepreneurs — 33,000 and counting — start new businesses in Eastern Africa.

We empower women entrepreneurs with the business skills and confidence to start new businesses. They use their income to educate their children and keep them healthy. To fight the devastating impact of climate change. To become respected leaders in their patriarchal communities.

To become an entrepreneur in the truest sense of the term — challenge social norms and change the definition of what’s possible. LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR MODEL ›

MEET BOMA’s Entrepreneurs

Rose Lelesiit

Primary business: Convenience Store

“I did not know the importance of schooling my kids. But now I have enrolled all of them in schools. My community has always been made of of herders — but as BOMA participants, we have shown other women how business can be profitable.

I earlier had no phone, but now I own one and am eager daily to learn more about the phone applications.

In three years time I see myself owning a big retail shop.”

Grace Nakera Endnog

Primary business: Donut baker

“Before BOMA, I had to rely on “cash” work. I did things like making fences for cattle, washing clothes for other people, and selling charcoal. The work was tough on me, and the income was unpredictable. My life changed after a BOMA mentor taught me about running a business and saving up for emergencies. I began running a convenience store selling household stables like sugar, flour and oil.

My store suffered after COVID-19.  I decided to change and enter a different business. I started making and selling mandazi donuts. There’s always something you can do. No matter, where you are or what you do, you have to be innovative.

INVISIBLE
LOAD MORE

Jane Naimirdika

BOMA Mentor/Coach

“I joined BOMA in 2006, during Kenya’s worst drought in a decade. I started a business running a store with BOMA. The income helped my family and me survive the drought.

I decided to join BOMA as a mentor. Today, I mentor 150 women and help them start their own businesses. I spend nearly every day in the field.”

Holiya Eisimlebbe

Primary business: Livestock Trader

“Before when we did not have this business, we had no money and often had to go to bed hungry.

No project has ever given us hope like this one. The BOMA Project is exceptional. It is here, in our village. Our kids were starving. Now there is food to eat.

These other projects give you something for that moment and then go. This is something that will stay. This is something within us.”

Rose Lelesiit

Primary business: Convenience Store

“A while ago, I did not know the importance of schooling my kids. But now I have enrolled all of them in schools. My community has always been made of of herders. As BOMA participants we have shown other women how business can be profitable.

I earlier had no phone, but now I own one and am eager daily to learn more about the phone applications.

In three years time I see myself owning a big retail shop.”

Grace Nakera Endnog

Primary business: Convenience Store

“Before BOMA, I had to rely on “cash” work. I did things like making fences for cattle, washing clothes for other people, and selling charcoal. The work was tough on me, and the income was unpredictable. My life changed after a BOMA mentor taught me about running a business and saving up for emergencies. I began running a convenience store selling household stables like sugar, flour and oil.

My store suffered after COVID-19 but I decided to change and enter a different business. I started making and selling mandazi donuts. My customers aren’t coming to me. And so, I have started dropping off items like sugar at the homes of my customers. There’s always something you can do. No matter, where you are or what you do, you have to be innovative.

INVISIBLE
LOAD MORE

Jane Naimirdika

BOMA Mentor/Coach

“I joined BOMA in 2006, during Kenya’s worst drought in a decade. I started a business running a store with BOMA. The income helped my family and me survive the drought.

I decided to join BOMA as a mentor. Today, I mentor 150 women and help them start their own businesses. I spend nearly every day in the field.”

Holiya Eisimlebbe

Primary business: Livestock Trader

“Before when we did not have this business, we had no money and often had to go to bed hungry.

No project has ever given us hope like this one. The BOMA Project is exceptional. It is here, in our village. Our kids were starving. Now there is food to eat.

These other projects give you something for that moment and then go. This is something that will stay. This is something within us.”

Join Our Mailing List!

Get real-time updates on how women entrepreneurs are transforming their families, their communities and our world.

PHOTO ESSAY:

HOW BOMA’S WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS ARE BATTLING THE IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE

The people of Northern Kenya were traditionally pastoralists. But climate change has reduced available pasture for grazing. Because they live in patriarchal societies, the women have little to no say in the management of their land and their livestock. With the BOMA Project, that’s changing. LEARN MORE ›

WHAT WE DO

We empower families that are so poor that they wouldn’t qualify for a microfinance loan. Families that don’t have access to mobile phones or bank accounts. Families that don’t have access to capital and markets.
BOMA’s Rural Entrepreneurship Access Program (REAP) “graduates” families out of poverty through a six-stage process:

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

We have had 30 years of government and donor funded projects in our country and have seen no changes in the levels of poverty. BOMA came here just 18 months ago with a pilot project and already we have seen close to 10,000 women and children move out of poverty.

Julius Leseetho, Deputy Governor, Samburu County

One of 19 winners of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global Grand Challenge: Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development

2018 EQUALS in Tech Awards Finalist given to organizations and people who are helping girls and women get equal access, skills and opportunities through technology.

Among the first four nonprofits worldwide to pass a rigorous “impact audit” conducted by Impact Matters to assess nonprofits in four key areas: cost-effectiveness, transparency, knowledge sharing, and “theory of change” (how well the organization accomplishes its mission).

MAKE AN IMPACT WITH BOMA

HELP FAMILIES BUILD RESILIENCE TO EXTREME SHOCKS
DONATE NOW

OUR IMPACT SINCE 2009

women entrepreneurs

children's lives transformed

women and children to date reached

businesses launched

savings groups established

IN THE NEWS

The Power of Hope is Real

By Nicholas Kristof
The New York Times

MAKE AN IMPACT WITH BOMA

ENABLE WOMEN TO BUILD RESILIENCE AND TRANSFORM LIVES

FEATURED IN